REPAIR - REMODEL.COM This site to do it yourself and homeowners covering all aspects of residential home, business building repair and remodeling, and renovation projects . Featuring tips, advice, how-to and step-by-step information to help you maintain and improve the value of your business building and home.

                www.repair-remodel.com    

In depth information on do it yourself home property maintenance, covering all aspects of residential home, commercial, business, and apartment building repair, remodeling, and renovation projects Featuring tips, advice, how-to and step-by-step information to help you maintain and improve the value of your business building and home.

Home | Site  Map | Ozone Generator | Search | Contact Us |Link Directory | Workplace Mold | Air Conditioning Mold

| Mold  Advice Books | Mold Test Kits | Mold Lab Services | Mold Cleaner & Killer |
| Video Inspection Scope | Mold Training | Mold Legal Forms | Mold Attorney | 
| Visa for USA Immigration |  Marriage Matchmaking Service |  FREE Mold Advice Hotline  
| DIY Mold Removal | Do It Yourself Mold Removal | DIY Mold |

Repairing & Maintaining Roof Gutters

Introduction

Gutter are an important part of your home’s weatherproofing  system. For many homeowners, their gutter system is a secondary concern and often gets neglected. Don’t make that mistake! It is important that you maintain a free-flowing gutter system because your gutters prevent rain from running of your roof too close to your house and into its basement, crawl space, and foundations. Flowing water away from your house properly will protect your foundation, keep stains from developing on your siding, and keep walkways ice-free in the wintertime.

Cleaning and Maintenance. The most basic, but necessary maintenance you should do is cleaning out your gutter system thoroughly to remove leaves, dirt, and other debris that will obstruct or hinder the free flow of rain water. You should clean and repair your gutter twice a year – once in the spring and once in the fall. Begin by securely placing your ladder so that you can reach the gutter easily. Do not rest the ladder directly on the gutter, as you will damage them! You may be interested in gutter attachments that allow you to raise your ladder higher without damaging your gutter.

1. Using rubber gloves, manually clean out any debris that you can reach in the gutter. It is a good idea to throw the debris into a bucket or garbage can directly so that you do not make a mess around your home.

2. While you are cleaning, you should hammer or replace any nails that might have loosened.

3. Use a water hose and spray down the gutter of any small debris. You should see the water flow out cleanly from the downspout.

4. If the water does not flow out cleanly, or your downspout flows directly into a main drain, you should disassemble the downspout joint from the gutter. Remove any retaining screws and hardware from the joint.

5. Pull the joint downward to remove it from the gutter.

6. After removing the downspout, spray water through it until it flushes clean. You may have to use an auger if there are very stubborn clogs.

7. Before returning the downspout to the gutter, you will need to scrape off the adhesive from the hardware and inspect the downspout and the gutter to be sure that it is not damaged or dented.

8. Use a silicone sealant around the downspout attachment and slip the downspout back into place.

9. Remember to replace the retaining hardware so that the downspout is secure to the gutter.

10.  After giving the sealant to dry, spray water down the gutter system to ensure that it is watertight and that the water flows out properly. If there are any damaged areas, move onto our Gutter Repair tutorial.

 Materials Needed
 Gutter Caulk – Silicone caulk will work best
 Sheet Metal Screws

 Tools Needed
 Rubber Gloves – Dish gloves will do fine
 Caulk Gun
 Screwdriver
 Hammer
 Extension Ladder
 

Repairing & Maintaining Gutter

1. Leaking and Damaged Downspout. You will sometimes find that the downspout joints loosen and lose their ability to be watertight. Start by removing the screws holding the joint together or the retaining hardware depending on how yours is attached.

2. Pull apart the pieces in the joint and use the wire brush to remove any existing caulk on both the outside of the male piece and the inside of the female piece of the joint.

3. Inspect the hardware to be sure that the hardware is not in such condition that it is not reusable. Your downspout might be dented so that it cannot be used or your retaining hardware may be damaged. Replace any pieces that cannot be reused with new material.

4. Apply caulk to the outside of the male piece of the joint, near the end, and reattach the female piece

5. Secure the joint with screws or other retaining hardware suitable for your gutter.

6. Leaking gutter sections. If you find a leak at the joint, and there is no apparent damage such as rust or dents, your sealant is most likely the culprit. Try to scrape away as much of the old caulk sealant that is visible.

7. Then, simply apply a joint caulk, such as silicone, to waterproof the joint.

8. Use your putty knife to spread roofing cement onto the clean area and the surrounding areas. Try to keep the patch as flat as possible so that water will run down your gutter properly. If your rusted area is very large or you want to make a more permanent fix, you should replace the entire gutter section or cut out the damaged section and replace it.

9. Replacing a damaged gutter section. There are times when you will have to remove and replace sections of your gutter system that have been damaged by rust or falling debris such as tree branches or ice. Before replacing sections of gutter that are sagging, be sure that it is your gutter, and not the gutter support, which has failed. You should first remove any retaining hardware from the section of gutter that you need to replace. As shown, remove the retainers and connectors.

10.  Use a 4x4 block of wood and place it inside the good section of gutter as you cut the bad section out with a hacksaw. This will keep your gutter in good shape while you are cutting and prevent the gutter from twisting as you cut it.

11.  Cut out a section of gutter to replace the piece you have cut out of the existing gutter. Cut the replacement section about 2” longer than the section that is being replaced to allow for some overlap.

12.  Using your caulk gun, apply roofing cement to the inside of the original gutter and place the new section into place so that it overlaps about an inch on each side.

13.  Drill holes appropriate to your rivets into the overlapping sections of the gutter, and securely fasten the sections together with rivets.

14.  Replace any retaining hardware that you originally removed, so that the gutter stays in place.

Materials Needed

1. Gutter Caulk – Silicone caulk will work best

2. Plastic Roofing Cement

3. Gutter Liner

4. Sheet Metal Screws

5. Tools Needed

6. Hammer

7. Putty Knife

8. Wire brush

9. Caulk gun

10.  Screwdriver

11.   Paintbrush

12.  Hacksaw

13.  Heavy-duty Scissors

Replacing Asphalt Shingles

Introduction
Your home’s roof is the first line of defense in keeping the elements out. A common problem among both new and old roofs alike is damaged shingles. Wind, falling tree limbs, or just normal wear and tear can damage shingles. It is critical to replace damaged shingles to prevent more expensive damage from occurring.
This project involves standing on your roof.

f you are afraid of heights this might not be the best project for you to attempt. Always keep in mind that roof pitches are very deceiving. What appears to be a moderate slope and potentially easy to stand on might be very dangerous. It is essential that you have a good strong ladder. Please do not attempt this project if you are unsure of your ladder’s stability.
 

Caution! Always check your ladder for structural integrity and make sure it is in good shape.

Caution! Before staring, note the location of power lines. Be sure to place your ladder a safe distance away.

Tips! Try to pick a warm day to do this project as the shingles will be more flexible and therefore easier to work with.

Tips! Soft bottom tennis shoes seem to give you the best traction working on moderately slopped roofs.

1. This tutorial deals with replacing a single shingle. The steps are the same for multiple shingles. In order to remove the damaged shingle, you will need to loosen the first row of good shingles above the damaged one. Use a prybar or putty knife to gently pry away the adjacent shingles so that good shingles are separated from the damaged one.

2. Once the surrounding shingles are completely separated, gently rock the damaged shingle back and forth to remove it. Continue this process until all the damaged shingles have been removed.

3. The next step is to remove the existing nails. Lift the uppermost good shingle, and pry the nails out, being extremely careful not to damage surrounding shingles (a small block of wood under the pry bar will help you achieve this). Try to remove as many nails as possible where you removed shingles.

4.  If there are nails that cannot remove, drive them flush to the roof with a hammer. There should be roughly four nails for each shingle. Do not leave any nails raised above the sheathing.

5. Now prep the area for the new shingle by patching any holes or tears in the felt underlayment. One of the easiest ways to do this is to apply roofing cement using a caulk gun. Squeeze out some cement and spread it thinly and evenly over the damaged area with a putty knife. It is also a good idea to cover the nails that were hammered flush with the roof sheathing with the cement as well. Have some rags or paper towels available as the cement can be very messy to work with.

6. If you are installing several new shingles, always start at the lowest shingle removed and work your way up. Align the first shingle with the existing shingles and attach it with four galvanized roofing nails (or with the number of nails the manufacturer recommends). Nails should be driven in 3/4 inch above the shingle tabs. Continue applying shingles upwards and take care that the new shingles line up properly with the existing ones.

7. Next, gently pry up the upper most existing shingle, being careful not to crack it and carefully slide the final shingles into place and nail them accordingly. It's always a good idea to put a small dab of roofing cement on the last shingle where the top good shingle will come into contact with the new shingle. Do not be concerned that your new shingles do not stick to each other. The shingles are manufactured with a roofing cement strip, which becomes extremely tacky with a few warm, sunny days and will ensure a tight seal against the elements.

Materials Needed

·    Roofing cement (in caulk tube)

·    Galvanized roofing nails

·    Shingles

·    Tools Needed

·    Ladder

·    Small pry bar

·    Putty knife

·    Caulk gun

·    Hammer

·    Paper towel or rags

Bag Sag - A Tip on Gutter

In August, gutter aren't a thought, but September rains make them an issue. If your gutter aren't draining quickly and drip long after the drizzle fizzles, water may well be collecting in a low spot caused by sagging. If that's the case, grab a helper and snap a chalk line along the gutter using both ends of its top edge as your guiding points. (You should have a slope of 1 inch for every 16 feet of gutter). Look for spots where the gutter's edge falls below the chalk line, then refasten the spikes, straps or brackets that hold it in place to get it back in line.

Clean Gutter

Anyone who's cleaned out a gutter knows it's a messy job with an even messier time cleaning up the debris on the ground after it's been cleaned out of the gutter. But it's a seasonal task that is necessary for your utters to be able to drain moisture away from your roof and foundations during the winter months.

Reasons to Clean

Water doesn't drain from the downspouts when leaves and other debris clog at the elbows and downspouts, causing overflow. Cleaning this is an easy, do-it-yourself job. Simply insert a hose from the bottom and stuff the opening around the hose with rags so that all the water's force goes upward toward whatever's blocking the pipe.

When water overflows from gutter and drips from joints, the leaks can be sealed with caulk. There's no substitute for cleaning out your gutter system in the spring and fall. Your gutter and downspouts direct rain and snowmelt away from the foundation of the house. When your gutter is clogged with leaves and needles, the water can overflow and collect near the house, seeping through the foundation walls and into the basement.

Strong winds can loosen and blow the mineral granules off asphalt shingles. These can drain into your gutter and downspouts and clog them up.

Strainers and Guards

Leaf strainers and wire mesh don't always work. They're designed to keep debris out of the gutter, but the leaves may cling to the screening or the strainer, so they also may keep water from the gutter, essentially negating the effectiveness of your drainage system.

Copyright 1999-2003, Service Magic, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Extend a Downspout

In a heavy rain, gutter collect an enormous amount of water from a large roof area and typically send it down only a few downspouts. The water should then be directed at least 3 feet away from the house (and preferably more). Unfortunately most gutter installers simply terminate the downspout with an elbow at the bottom. All that water can cause surface erosion, excessive settling of the earth around the foundation, and damp or wet basements. Fortunately it's very easy for you to solve the problem. Add an extension, such as a 5-ft. length of downspout or any of several devices made for this purpose, to the end of each elbow.

Materials Needed:

·    Downspout or similar extension

·    Drill and 1/16- or 1/8-in. twist drill bits

·    Elbows (as needed)

·    Rivet tool

·    1/8-in.-dia. x 1/8-in.-long aluminum rivets

·    Work gloves

·    3/8-in. No. 6 sheet metal screws

·    Hacksaw with fine-tooth blade

·    Splash block

·    Metal flat file (fine)                                                                             

·    Eye protection

·    Screwdriver 

1. Cut the Downspout: Downspouts are widely available in 10-ft. lengths, but can be easily cut in two with a fine-tooth hacksaw blade. To prevent the saw blade from binding in the cut, hold the downspout firmly in place and allow the cutoff to fall freely. Caution:  Wear gloves to protect your hands and goggles to protect your eyes when sawing or drilling into metal. Use a metal file to remove any burrs and to dull the sharp cut edges.

2. Drill Holes: Slide the extension over the end of the downspout elbow and drill through the extension and the elbow with a 1/8-in. bit. If your downspout ends with a straight section, you must install an elbow first, using the procedure described in this and the next step.

3.  Install Rivet: Insert a rivet in the end of the riveting tool and squeeze the handle until the tool locks onto it. Press the rivet into the drilled hole until it is fully seated, then squeeze the handle to compress the rivet and "pop" off the rivet shaft. Rivets are good connectors because there's no point to catch leaves or other debris. Alternatively, however, you can use 3/8-in. No. 6 aluminum sheet metal screws installed into 1/16-in. pilot holes.

Tip: If you ever need to remove a rivet to clear a clog or replace a damaged extension pipe, simply drill through the rivet with the same-size bit that you used to install it. Use a high-speed drill and apply very light pressure as you drill, or the rivet may just spin in place.  Install Splash Block: To prevent surface erosion and direct water away from the foundation, place a splash block under the end of your downspout (shown) or downspout extension.
 

4. Install Splash Block: To prevent surface erosion and direct water away from the foundation, place a splash block under the end of your downspout (shown) or downspout extension.

Written by Roy Barnhart, home improvement expert, Fairfield, CT.

Gutter Clutter

Before fall storms come your way, you might want to spend an afternoon in the gutter... on your roof. First, clean out all the debris from the gutter. (If you own a leaf blower, there's a nifty little gutter attachment that makes the job a breeze. Ask for it at your nearest hardware store.) Or use a plastic gutter scoop to clean it out. Next, check for rusted-out patches and other holes in the gutter. Next, flush out the downspout with a hose. To avoid any further clogging, install leaf guards that prevent leaves and large debris from getting into the gutter. Cleaning gutter may be a lot or work, but at least you won't suddenly get gutter overflows spilling onto your sidewalks, siding or driveways.

Installing New Gutter

One of the main protectors of your home's siding and foundation against water damage is your gutter. We rely on them to channel the water away from the house. Unfortunately, because they get used so much, gutter get damaged regularly. Some of the damages are easy to repair (see gutter repairs). Other damage is so extensive that it is easier to install an entirely new gutter system t10han repair the existing one.

There are many different types of  available but the best is the vinyl snap-together kind. These gutter are moderately priced and almost completely maintenance free. They don't distort the way metal gutter do. If they dent, just pop it out. And vinyl gutter are easiest to put up.

Tools and Materials You Need:

·    Extension ladder (you need one that reaches 3 feet above the edge of your roof to provide stability)

·    Ladder stabilizer

·    2 stakes and wooden pieces (act as brace for ladder feet)

·    Tape measure

·    Vinyl gutter sections (sold in 10-foot sections, measure total length you need and add 15 percent as waste)

·    Vinyl gutter hangers (one hanger for every 2 feet)

·    Vinyl inside or outside corners (one for every corner that doesn't have a downspout or isn't an end of a run)

·    Vinyl connectors (2 for every corner and then one every 10 feet)

·    Vinyl end caps (one for each end)

·    Vinyl downspout outlets (one every 35 feet)

·    Vinyl downspout elbows (3 for each downspout)

·    Vinyl drainpipe (one for every downspout, sold in 10-foot sections, measure gutter height and add 5 feet for waste)

·    Vinyl drainpipe hangers (2 for every drain pipe)

·    Chalk line

·    Hacksaw

·    Powered screwdriver

·    1 1/4-inch deck screws

·    Tip:  Safety: Use an adjustable ladder stabilizer that attaches to your ladder and braces on the roof. This helps keep the ladder from slipping and allows you to work on the gutter that are directly in front of you. It is important to brace the feet of the ladder. Put the ladder feet on blocks and then drive a stake into the ground so that it is right behind the ladder feet.

Step 1. Plan Gutter Run: Make a map of your house before you buy any gutter. Figure out how long the gutter run is, how many downspouts you need and the length of those downspouts. If your old gutter system worked well, you want to copy it. That is, put the downspouts where the old downspouts were, etc. Your local hardware store can help you figure out which vinyl gutter work with your house. When making your purchase, you have a choice of brown or white gutter to complement your house color.

Step 2. Snap Chalk Line to Guide Gutter: There are two ways to mark the slope of your gutter. If the gutter run is less than or equal to 35 feet, then the high point of the run is at one end and slopes down to the other end where the downspout is. The high point is 1-inch down from the top of the fascia (the board that the gutter hang from) and the  slope of 1 inch for every 16 feet of gutter. If the gutter run is more than 35 feet, then the high point is in the middle of the run and it slopes down to the downspouts on each side.

Again, the high point is 1-inch down from the top of the fascia and the slopes are 1/4 inch every 10 feet. (See figure at left.) If the house has a run less than 35-feet, the high point of the run is at one end of the roof. (See figure below.) Measure 1-inch down from the top of the fascia at both ends and slope the gutter at 1/4 inch every 10 feet toward the downspout in the middle. Mark the slope by snapping the chalk line so that you have a guideline when putting up the gutter. Have someone hold one end while you hold the other.

Step 3. Install Downspout Outlets: Attach the downspout outlets using one of the 1 1/4-inch deck screws. The outlets should be even with the chalk line and lined up so that the downspout attaches at the edge of the house. These outlets won't be at the extreme end of the run because the roof goes out farther than the house. In Step 7 you attach small sections of gutter at the very end left of the roof.

·    Tip:  Use a powered screwdriver. This makes the project go much faster.

Step 4. Attach Gutter Hangers: Fasten the gutter hangers to the fascia every 24 inches. Start attaching them, using 1 1/4-inch deck screws, about 1 inch away from the ends of the roof to give the gutter support at the ends and to make room for the end cap. Make sure that you are following the chalk line so that the gutter are angled properly.

Step 5. Put on Gutter Corners: Attach the corners that don't have downspouts and shouldn't be the end of the run.

Step 6. Attach End of Gutter Run and Cut Gutter: Cut the gutter sections with the hacksaw so they fit between the downspout outlet and the end of the roof. The section should go from about the middle of the downspout outlet to the roof end. Put on the end cap and snap the section into the downspout outlet. Hook the gutter onto the hanger. Cut the other sections so that they go between the downspout outlets. Remember that the gutter section starts from about the middle of the downspout outlet.

·    Tip:  When cutting gutter, you need a solid base to work from, so turn the gutter upside down and have it resting on the ground or a piece of wood as you cut.

Step 7. Hang Gutter: Do this step on the ground. Connect the gutter sections together using the connectors. The connectors just snap onto the gutter sections. Also, if you have a run that is less than 35 feet, you need to attach the end cap to the end without an outlet. Now, with another person, hang the gutter. The other person needs to hold one end while you snap the gutter into the outlet and then while you hook the gutter onto the hangers.

Step 8. Attach Beginning of Drain Pipe: Now for the downspouts: Cut a piece of drainpipe so that it fits between the downspout elbow on the outlet and the downspout elbow on the wall. Put the elbows on the pipe and snap it onto the outlet. Use a drainpipe hanger to secure the other elbow to the wall.

Step 9. Install Drain Pipe: Cut another piece of drainpipe that fits between the elbow on the wall and 1 foot above the ground. Snap the drain pipe into the elbow at the top and attach another elbow to the bottom. Fasten a drain pipe hanger at the lower elbow. Cut a section of pipe to funnel the water away from the base of your house; this length depends on you.

Tip:  Buy a plastic splash block. This protects you house from the gutter water by keeping the water from seeping back toward the house.

Install Copper Gutter

Copper Gutter

Copper is an expensive material that is strong, durable, rust-resistant and nearly maintenance free. It will weather green unless you coat it with a clear sealant. It needs to be installed by a professional.

Gutter Basics

Gutter are critical components of a house because they protect both the roof and the foundations from moisture damage by channeling water from the roof out away from the house.

The standard square-edge style is also called the "box" style. It has sharp, boxy, square edges, and you see this on a lot of commercial sites. The "ogee detail" style, which kind of looks like an exterior crown molding, is also called "K-style." It's slightly more decorative, giving your home's exterior a more finished look.

You'll need a variety of pieces to make your gutter system work. Both inside and outside corner pieces for gutter are also known as elbow joints. They're used to make right turns in your gutter system.

Copyright 1999-2003, Service Magic, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Install Galvanized Gutter

Galvanized Gutter

Galvanized is a strong and inexpensive material choice for your gutter system. It can rust.

Gutter Installation Basics

Gutter are critical components of a house because they protect both the roof and the foundations from moisture damage by channeling water from the roof out away from the house.

The standard square-edge style is also called the "box" style. It has sharp, boxy, square edges, and you see this on a lot of commercial sites. The "ogee detail" style, which kind of looks like an exterior crown molding, is also called "K-style." It's slightly more decorative, giving your home's exterior a more finished look.

You'll need a variety of pieces to make your gutter system work. Both inside and outside corner pieces for gutter are also known as elbow joints. They're used to make right turns in your gutter system.

Copyright 1999-2003, Service Magic, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Install PVC Gutter

PVC Gutter

Vinyl, or PVC, is a tough, maintenance-free, moderately-priced material popular with newer installations.

 

Gutter Basics

 

Gutter are critical components of a house because they protect both the roof and the foundations from moisture damage by channeling water from the roof out away from the house.

The standard square-edge style is also called the "box" style. It has sharp, boxy, square edges, and you see this on a lot of commercial sites.

 

The "ogee detail" style, which kind of looks like an exterior crown molding, is also called "K-style." It's slightly more decorative, giving your home's exterior a more finished look.

You'll need a variety of pieces to make your gutter system work. Both inside and outside corner pieces for gutter are also known as elbow joints. They're used to make right turns in your gutter system.

Copyright 1999-2003, Service Magic, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Install Vinyl Rain Gutter

An enormous quantity of rainwater falls on your roof. Without a rain gutter it all gets dumped right next to the foundation. The most popular gutter options are aluminum and vinyl systems. Of those two, a vinyl system is probably the easiest to install and the sturdiest. Vinyl systems are typically available in white or brown, but can be painted with 100% acrylic latex paint. (Note: Painting them eliminates the maintenance-free benefit.) They are available in two or three profiles, with internal or external (hidden or visible) mounting brackets.

There are two standard widths -- 4-inch for roofs up to 750 square feet in area, and 5-inch for larger roof areas. It's better to err on large side if you live in areas subject to downpours or if gutter are likely to become clogged with leaves; and increase the number of downspouts above the minimum guidelines of one per 30 to 40 feet. If you live in snowy/icy areas, also go above the minimum recommended number of hangers. The roof must have an effective drip edge so water will drop into the gutter. Several manufacturers offer a combination leaf-guard/drip-edge. To determine the area of a roof plane, multiply length times width - but don't walk on a roof to get the distance from peak to eaves. Just count the number of roof courses and multiply by the exposure.

Before You Begin: Ask your supplier for an estimating and installation guide so you can generate a shopping list. Round up a couple of ladders that will allow you and a helper to work comfortably at the roof edge -- measuring and installation are both two-person tasks. Ideally a gutter should be pitched 1/16 inch/foot for drainage. But the outer top edge of the gutter ideally should line up with the roof plane and, therefore, be level. Most people prefer a level installation, which will drain better and looks better. It's your call.

1. Establish a Level Line: Place a straightedge flat on the roof and so it extends about 6 inches over the roof edge. Hold a drop outlet in position against the fascia and slide it up until the outer edge contacts the straightedge. Mark the location of the mounting holes with a pencil. Do the same at the other end of this roof section. Stretch a chalk line between marks; check that it is level; and snap a line.

·    Tip: The drip edge should extend 1 to 2 inches beyond the fascia. If there's too much roof overhang, pad out the gutter with wood blocks on the fascia; if there's too little, extend the drip edge.

2. Install Corners: To pitch a gutter, measure the length of the roof section. On2. Install Corners Position any corners on the guideline and secure them to the fascia with rust-resistant screws (here an inside corner is shown). If your fascia is angled, or if there are exposed rafter tails and no fascia board, manufacturers supply special accessories or hangers that allow the gutter to be installed at the proper angle. the end where you'll put the drop outlet, lower the line1/16 inch for every foot of length. Then snap the guideline.

3. Install Drop Outlets: Similarly, align and fasten all the drop outlets at the planned locations. You'll need one outlet for every 30 to 40 feet of gutter. This one is at the end of a run. On a very long-run roof edge, you might choose to install an outlet at each end. Then either install the gutter level or pitch it from a high point in the middle.

4. Install Brackets: Install brackets on the fascia spaced between 30 and 36 inches apart (24 and 30 inches apart, if you live in an area that gets heavy snow). Align each bracket with the guideline and fasten it with a rust-resistant screw. An external bracket is shown here; you may choose to use hidden brackets, which are also secured with screws.

5. Install Gutter Sections: Starting at an end or corner, snap a 10-foot gutter onto the brackets. Attach a connector to the end of the gutter (left). This style hooks over the back of the gutter; then it is wrapped around the gutter, snapped over the front edge and screwed to the fascia. Install each additional gutter section and connector this way until you are less than 10 feet from the end of the run.

6. Cut Gutter to Fit: Measure to determine the proper length for the last section of gutter. Transfer the measurement to a 10-foot section of gutter (upside down), and use a fine-tooth saw such as a backsaw to cut it to length. If you have a miter box, use it to guide your cut. When you complete the cut, file off any burrs and install it. Wear goggles when cutting.

7. Attach End Caps: Lubricate the seal and attach an end cap on the drop outlet (left). If there is a drop outlet or an open gutter at the other end of the run, install an end cap there, too. Repeat the above procedures until all the gutter are installed.

8. Install Elbow on Drop Outlet: Cut a short piece of downspout (or use a special bushing supplied for this purpose). Install it between the drop outlet and a 45-degree elbow.

9. Complete Offset: Attach an elbow to the top of a short downspout and hold it against the wall so the open ends of the two elbows face each other. Then measure the length of downspout for the offset, and the length of downspout(s) to extend from the elbow to just above the ground. Cut the downspout lengths, install the elbow between them and attach that assembly to the elbow on the outlet.

10. Optional Elbow: If you live in an area where leaves are likely to land in your gutter and if your downspout is connected to a closed drain that could get clogged, consider using this special elbow instead of a standard one. The angled grate forces leaves out the front opening but allows water to continue on its path.

11. Attach Downspout to Wall: Secure the downspout to the wall with a bracket at the top (near the offset) and at the bottom. On downspouts over 10 feet long, use a downspout coupler to join the sections of downspout and install a bracket at that location, too.

12. Attach Diverter: Install a 45-degree elbow at the bottom of the downspout to direct water away from the house. Then attach a hinged plastic diverter to the elbow to carry the water a few feet away. Alternately, attach a length of downspout to the elbow or let the water drop from the elbow onto a concrete or plastic splash block. Install the remaining downspouts and enjoy the rest of your weekend.

Tools and Materials

·    Ladders

·    Tape measure

·    Chalk line

·    2-foot spirit level

·    Goggles

·    Drill/driver and bits

·    Fine-tooth saw

·    Gutter system

Written by Roy Barnhart, home improvement expert, Fairfield, CT. Illustrated by artist George Retseck

Locate a Roof Leak

When a roof leaks, water is getting under or through two possible areas:

·    the roofing material (asphalt or wood shingles, roll roofing, etc.);

·    the flashing and gaskets that protect valleys, edges, and penetrations such as chimneys, vent pipes, and skylights.

Warning signs include visible dampness or mold on interior walls and ceilings, peeling paint or wallpaper, or simply damp odors, especially in confined spaces such as hallways.

The source of a roof leak is not always obvious. A leak may not be directly above the water stain on a ceiling or wet spot on the attic floor; it may travel horizontally under shingles and then down the roof sheathing before penetrating at a seam. Some apparent "leaks" may in fact be condensation on the underside of the roof caused by inadequate attic ventilation.

It helps to know the most common leak locations. The most obvious ones are wherever the roofing is visibly missing or damaged, but more often leaks occur at flashing points (valleys and roof penetrations). In northern climates, where roofs are exposed to snow and ice, roofs that are otherwise in perfect condition may leak in the lower foot or two of the roof when snow or ice build up, forming a dam that collects water from melting snow. If leaks occur only at these locations and under these conditions, the solution lies in preventing the dams (a matter of proper ceiling insulation and eave ventilation).

1. Inspect Attic Floor: Pick a rainy day to go up to the attic and look for dripping water or signs of water, such as water stains, wet or moldy insulation, or mold on the attic floor. (If the ceiling is attached directly to roof rafters, such as with a cathedral ceiling or flat roof, skip to Step 4).

·    Caution: Use caution in an unfloored attic. Lay down catwalks, making sure the ends of boards fall over framing members. These will make getting around safer; and by distributing your weight more evenly you are less likely to cause "nail pops" in drywall ceilings (especially in truss ceilings or older homes with undersized ceiling joists).

2. Inspect Roof Sheathing: Examine the underside of the roof. Follow any water trail to its highest point. Pay particular attention to areas around plumbing vent pipes, chimneys, and wherever changes in the roof structure occur (valleys, dormers). Localized water, black mold, or damp wood at these points probably mean the flashing either has holes in it or was not properly installed. If the leak seems to occur in the middle of the roof, you have a shingle problem somewhere above that point.

·    Tip: To minimize any damage, tack a piece of string into the stream of water and extending straight down into a bucket. The water will tend to follow the string rather than run down the underside of the sheathing or rafter.

3. Take Measurements: Mark the spot with a marker or crayon and, if necessary, take some measurements from points such as the ridge or sidewall that will help you locate the leak from the outside.

4. Inspect Roofing:

·    a. Asphalt shingles. If your leak is midroof or at the ridge (rare), and is, therefore, shingle-related, look for damaged or missing shingles.
b. Roll roofing. Inspect for damaged roofing on flat or nearly flat roofs covered with roll roofing.
c. Wood shingles and shakes. Look for cracked shingles or shakes. In a wood roof, leaks may also occur if the shingles were not properly installed with a minimum sidelap of at least 1-1/2 inches between joints of shingles in adjacent courses. (Water falling in a gap between two shingles would therefore need to travel horizontally at least 1-1/2 inches before getting to a joint in the course below.)

·    Caution: To avoid damaging a roof and to avoid unnecessary risk, stay off it unless absolutely necessary, especially in hot weather and when roofing is old and dried out. Never walk on a wet roof. At minimum, make your initial observations from a ladder, or use binoculars.

5. Inspect Flashings: Look for leaves and other debris that may be slowing the downward movement of water. Look carefully for corrosion in metal flashings or open joints where they connect to a chimney or other roof penetration. Look for dried out rubber gaskets at plumbing vents. (Most are replaceable.)

6. Inspect Attachments: If you have an antenna, satellite dish, or other object attached to the roof with screws or nails, make sure that flashing cement was used over the fasteners (or that it has not dried out).

7. Inspect Cement Repairs: If there are any areas covered with black flashing cement, examine the cement carefully for pinholes or cracks. The presence of such cement usually indicates a stopgap repair of a past leak, and such repairs are never permanent.

Mind in the Gutter

Some leaves won't make it all the way to the ground. In fact, they may land on your roof, blow into your gutter and create massive leaf-clots in your downspout. Then comes the water leaks and maybe even a flood from above, straight through your ceilings. Scared yet? Protect yourself by installing leaf strainers at the top of your downspouts. Or, for even better protection, cover the whole length of your gutter with a wire mesh gutter-guard.

Mind in the Gutter  

If you have a house with steel rain gutter, you'll want to check them for rusted patches. Catch the problem early and it's a cinch to fix. Just buff off the rust, clean off the area and coat the hole with plastic cement. If a large hole is already there, you can treat it by laying down aluminum foil or plastic on top of the plastic cement. If it's too big even for this method, consider either replacing the section of gutter or laying in a piece of metal flashing to bridge the gap.

More Products From The Internet's Largest Hardware Store

Repair Aluminum Gutter

Aluminum Gutter

Aluminum is a moderately priced and rust-resistant material popular with newer installations. It comes unfinished or factory-painted. The downside is that aluminum tends to leak at joints because the metal expands and contracts too much for sealant to hold permanently. Also it dents easily.

Gutter Basics

Gutter are a critical component of your house because they prevent moisture damage by channeling water off the roof and away from the foundation. But any damaged lengths of gutter or drainpipe can cause leaks which can negate the gutter and result in water damage to your home.

When gutter fail, you need to evaluate the type and extent of damage in order to select the best repair method. Some minor repairs can be done yourself.

Of course, keeping your gutter free of debris and leaves (use a trowel if you do it yourself) and flushing out clogged downspouts is essential. Mesh gutter guards will help prevent clogs in the future.

Copyright 1999-2003, Service Magic, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Repair Copper Gutter

Copper Gutter

Copper is an expensive gutter material that is strong, durable, rust-resistant and nearly maintenance free. It will weather green unless you coat it with a clear sealant. It needs to be installed by a professional.

Gutter Basics

Gutter are a critical component of your house because they prevent moisture damage by channeling water off the roof and away from the foundation. But any damaged lengths of gutter or drainpipe can cause leaks which can negate the gutter and result in water damage to your home.

Gutter Problems

When gutter fail, you need to evaluate the type and extent of damage in order to select the best repair method. Some minor repairs can be done yourself. Gutter patching kits are also available at hardware stores and they are useful for making temporary small repairs.

Of course, keeping your gutter free of debris and leaves (use a trowel if you do it yourself) and flushing out clogged downspouts is essential. Mesh gutter guards will help prevent clogs in the future.

Repairing Metal Gutter

Rain can bring life to your lawn and garden, but it can be murder on your house. Gutter take the brunt of the storms and so they need to be taken care of. If they aren’t, they can cause extensive damage to the outside and inside of your house. Clogged, dented or torn gutter can create pools of water which then leak into your basement.

There are some new products that have been developed that work as preventive measures against clogs. One is a mesh gutter guard which covers the gutter so leaves can’t get into it. To prevent things from going down the downspout, there are downspout strainers. These items help prevent future problems, but there are some problems that you need to take care of now.

Some minor problems, such as holes and cracks, can be fixed by filling them with gutter caulk or by using a gutter patching kit. (These are applied to the inside of the gutter.) There are more serious problems in which you’ll need to patch a tear or replace a section of gutter. If you have extensive damage, you need to start over and install new gutter.

·    Caution:  Use an adjustable ladder stabilizer that attaches to your ladder and braces on the roof. This helps keep the ladder f room slipping and it also allows you to work on the gutter that are directly in front of you. It is important to brace the feet of the ladder. Put the ladder feet on blocks (to make them level) and then drive stakes into the ground so that they are right behind the ladder feet.

Patch a Tear in a Metal Gutter

Tools and Materials:

·    Extension ladder (one that reaches 3-feet above the edge of your roof to provide stability)

·    Ladder stabilizer

·    2 stakes and wooden pieces (act as brace for ladder)

·    Wire brush

·    Abrasive pad

·    Putty knife (small)

·    Roof cement

·    Metal flashing (made of same metal as gutter and big enough to cover bottom and side of gutter)

Step 1. Clean Area: Use the ladder with the ladder stabilizer to reach the gutter. Make sure you brace the feet of the ladder. Clean the damaged area with a wire brush. Go over it with an abrasive pad. Wash the dust and residue away. Let dry.

Step 2. Apply Roof Cement: Cover the damaged area, plus a few inches outside, with roof cement using the putty knife. You want the cement to be about 1/8-inch thick.

Step 3. Fix Patch with Roof Cement: Bend the flashing to fit the inside contours of the gutter. You want it to cover the damaged area and one side. Press the patch into the cement. With a little bit of roof cement, go over the edges of the patch. You want to feather the edges of the cement so that you don’t cause a dam to form. Feathering is done by using more pressure at the edges of the cement, thereby making it thinner.

Replacing Section of Gutter

Tools and Materials You Need:

·    Extension ladder (one that reaches 3 feet above the edge of your roof to provide stability)

·    Ladder stabilizer

·    2 stakes and wooden pieces (act as brace for ladder)

·    Wood spacer that is as wide as your gutter

·    Screwdriver or pry bar (depends on what kind of gutter hangers you have)

·    Little spacers (to put behind gutter when you are cutting)

·    Hacksaw

·    Gutter (same material and shape as the old one)

·    Wire brush

·    Gutter caulk

·    Screwdriver (may want to use an electric one)

·    6 sheet metal screws

Step 1. Remove Gutter Hangers: Use the ladder with the ladder stabilizer to reach the gutter. Make sure you brace the feet of the ladder. Take off any gutter hangers that are in or around the damaged area using the screwdriver or pry bar (depends on what kind of gutter hangers you have). Put the wood spacer in between the gutter to protect it. Now when you put pressure on the gutter, you won’t distort it.

Step 2. Cut Damaged Area Out: Slip the little spacers between the gutter and the wall. (This protects the roof and wall when you are cutting the gutter.) Cut out the damaged section of gutter using the hacksaw.

Step 3. Make Gutter Section: Cut the new gutter section so that it is 4 inches longer than the damaged area that you cut out. Turn the gutter upside down and cut, making sure you have a solid base to work from.

Step 4. Position Gutter Section: Use a wire brush and scrub the inside edges of the old gutter. Caulk the ends of the old gutter from the inside, about 2 inches worth on sides and bottom of gutter at each end. Then place the new piece into the old gutter. The new piece should be centered so that the caulk is covered on both ends. Press the new section into the caulk.

Step 5. Rehang Gutter: Screw or rivet the new pieces together using 3 on each side. Caulk over the screws that are exposed on the inside of the gutter. Reattach the gutter hangers.

Copyright 1999-2003, Service Magic, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Seamless Gutter Offer Trouble-Free Service
By: Paul Bianchina

In many parts of the country, good rain gutter can be essential. In any rainy area, gutter can make a substantial difference in protecting eaves, facia, and siding, and allow you to control and channel water to desired disposal sites.

There are lots of different gutter materials to choose from, including steel, aluminum, vinyl, copper, even wood, and many types of gutter - steel and vinyl in particular - are sold as a system of interlocking parts that are a tempting project for the do-it-yourselfer. But there's a downside to these gutter systems - seams. The gutter themselves are sold in 10' lengths, and are connected with slip couplings at each joint and corner, resulting in dozens of seams around the perimeter of the average home, each one of which is a weak spot and a potential leak site.

Another alternative well worth considering is the installation of seamless metal gutter. Seamless gutter must be fabricated on-site by a professional contractor, so there's no do-it-yourself savings to be had. But the improved performance of the entire gutter system is worth the additional investment, which usually is not that much more than a DIY system.

The seamless gutter system - also called a continuous gutter - is a little misleading in its name, since there actually are seams in the system. These occur only at the corners, however, and instead of slip fittings, these joints are typically riveted and sealed for stability and leak resistance. The gutter runs themselves are continuous, making them both strong and visually more appealing.

Selecting a Contractor

Your first step is to select a contractor, which you can find by word of mouth or by looking in the Yellow Pages under "Gutter and Downspouts." As with any contractor selection, look for a company with an established reputation, and confirm their current status with your local licensing authority.

The contractor will need to make a site visit in order to measure your home and discuss your options. At the time of the contractor's visit, request a sample of the proposed gutter so you can see the size, shape and quality of the material. You'll also want to look at a color chart, as well as a list of past-client references with addresses so you can drive by and take a look at the finished product.

Most seamless gutter contractors can offer you several options, including the size and sometimes the shape of the gutter, the size and shape of the downspout, and a palette of 20 or more color choices. If you want to paint the gutter to match your house, select a white or primed material for best paint coverage. If you can find a color you like, however, go with that instead - it saves you the time and expense of painting, and the factory colors are baked on for durability. For a truly distinctive look - at a rather distinctive price - most contractors also offer continuous copper gutter. Whatever your final choice, be sure and get a detailed estimate in writing.

Installation

For the average house, installation will be done in one day. The contractor will arrive with a truck- or trailer-mounted forming machine and a coil of flat metal in the color you've selected. Each run of eave is measured individually, and the metal is rolled through the forming machine to create a continuous piece of gutter that is custom sized to that eave.

The contractor will typically also have a couple of attachment options to offer you. One is the spike and ferrule - a hollow tube is placed inside the gutter to keep it from bending, then a long spike is driven through the face of the gutter at the top, through the ferrule and into the wood facia board. A better option is the eave hook - different companies will have different names for this - which interlocks into the gutter for a cleaner look and which is then attached to the roof under the shingles for superior strength. The eave hook option will probably be an extra charge, but the added strength is well worth the investment. In fact, some companies will offer a written guarantee against the gutter ever working loose from the house, a real plus in areas subject to lots of snow and ice.

The crew will work their way around the house, fabricating, installing and sealing each length of gutter and each inside or outside corner as they go. The last step is the installation of the downspouts, which will be located as needed according to the amount of roof runoff each section of gutter has to handle, as well as the where the best location is for directing the runoff away from the house. The price of the downspouts will be included in your estimate, but make sure the contractor has discussed downspout locations and options for water disposal with you so you know what to expect before the job starts.

Copyright 2001-2002 Inman News Features. Distributed by Inman News Features

Do-It-Best-Yourself Mold Solutions

Phil can help you fix your own property’s mold problems at low-cost, more safely, and better-in- results than what is done by many mold inspectors and mold contractors.  How can Phil help you?

     1. Read Phil’s five plain-English,
mold advice books to master mold inspection, testing, removal, remediation, and prevention for your house, condo, apartment, office,  or workplace.

     2. Buy do-it-yourself, affordable mold test kits, mold lab analysis, video inspection scope, mold cleaner, and mold killer, for the  successful toxic and household mold inspection, mold testing, mold species identification and quantification, mold cleaning, mold removal, and mold remediation to find mold, kill mold, clean mold, and remove mold from your residence or commercial building.

     3. Get FREE mold advice, mold help, and/or answers to your mold questions, by emailing mold expert Phillip Fry at
phil@moldinspector.com. You can also email pictures of your mold problems in jpeg file format as email attachments.
 

[Home] [Repair or Replace It?] [Electrical Repair] [Drywall] [Heat Air] [Roofing] [Door Repair] [Gutters] [Window Repair] [Kitchen Remodel] [Toilet Repair] [Carpet Repair] [Appliances] [Plumbing] [Home Repair Glossary] [Home Security] [Wood Refinishing] [Home Safety] [Electrical Repair] [Attic Repair] [Deck Cleaning] [Door Repair] [Concrete Repair] [Home Heating Tips] [Laminate Floors] [Wallpaper Repair] [Painting Interiors] [Painting Exteriors] [Building Book Cases] [Winter Fire Prevention Advice] [Search] [Bathroom Remodel] [Drywall] [Air Duct Cleaning] [About-Us] [Contact Us] [Link-Directory]

Helpful Environmental & Health Websites
| Mold Attorney | Caribbean Mold InspectionCertified Hygienists DirectoryCertified Mold Inspectors Directory | Condominium Mold Inspection | Environmental ProductsEnvironmental Hygienist Training | Factory Mould Inspection |Government Building Mold InspectionHospital Mold InspectionHotel Mold Inspection | Inspector Del MoldeLos Angeles Mold Inspection | |Miami Mold TestingMold Inspector Training | Mold Inspection | Mold Inspector | Mold Inspector Training | Mold Products and Services |Mold School | Mold TrainingMold Training And Certification | Office Mold Inspection | Orange County Mold InspectionPublic Building Mold Inspection | Sacramento Mold Inspection | San Diego Home Inspection | San Diego Mold Inspection | San Francisco Mold Inspection | San Jose Mold Inspection | School Mold Inspection | Senior Housing Mold Inspection |Store Mold InspectionToxic Mold Inspection | Toxic Mold Inspector | Warehouse Mold Inspection | Natural Supplements | Dietary Supplements | Male Performance Supplement | Tongkat Ali | Hong Kong Sex Pills | China Mould Testing | Air Conditioning Mold | Mold Test Kits | Ozone Blasting | Ozone Generator | Household Mold Removal | Workplace Mold | Mold Health | Mold Remediation Safety Gear |

Find Hidden Toxic Mold Growth by inspecting inside walls, ceilings, and heating/cooling ducts and equipment with your own Video PRO Inspection Scope

 

Buy Boric Acid as a Non-Toxic and Natural
 Way To Remove, Kill and Prevent Household Mold and Toxic Mold, as well as Kill Cockroaches

 

 

Do-It-Best-Yourself Mold Solutions

Phil can help you fix your own property’s mold problems at low-cost, more safely, and better-in- results than what is done by many mold inspectors and mold contractors.  How can Phil help you?

     1. Read Phil’s five plain-English,
mold advice books to master mold inspection, testing, removal, remediation, and prevention for your house, condo, apartment, office,  or workplace.

     2. Buy do-it-yourself, affordable mold test kits, mold lab analysis, video inspection scope, mold cleaner, mold killer,
and a mold-killing high ozone generator for the  successful toxic and household mold inspection, mold testing, mold species identification and quantification, mold cleaning, mold removal, and mold remediation to find mold, kill mold, clean mold, and remove mold from your residence or commercial building.

     3. Get FREE mold advice, mold help, and/or answers to your mold questions, by emailing mold expert Phillip Fry at
phil@moldinspector.com . You can also email pictures of your mold problems in jpeg file format as email attachments.

Home | Site  Map | Private Policy | Search | Contact Us | Links Directory | Ecotour/Travel Guide

Air Condition Information | Air Duct Cleaning | Appliance Repair and Remodel |Attic Repair |Bathroom Repair and Remodel |
Carpet Repair  | Concrete Repair Maintenance | Deck Cleaning | Door Repair | Electrical Repair | Gutter Repair and Remodel |
|
Home Heating Tips | Home Security | Home Safety | Kitchen Repair and Remodel | Laminate | Painting Exteriors |
|
Painting Interiors  | Plumbing Repair and Remodel | Roof Repair and Remodel | Toilet Repair and Remodel | Wall and Ceiling | Window Repair | Wood Refinishing |
Visa for USA Immigration |  Marriage Matchmaking Service | FREE Mold Advice Hotline


 


This website is owned and operated by Health & Wealth Guardian, LLT. Copyright©2002-2013 All Rights Reserved.