REPAIR - REMODEL.COM This site to do it yourself and homeowners covering all aspects of residential home, business building repair and remodeling, and renovation projects . Featuring tips, advice, how-to and step-by-step information to help you maintain and improve the value of your business building and home.

                www.repair-remodel.com    

In depth information on do it yourself home property maintenance, covering all aspects of residential home, commercial, business, and apartment building repair, remodeling, and renovation projects Featuring tips, advice, how-to and step-by-step information to help you maintain and improve the value of your business building and home.

Home | Site  Map | Ozone Generator | Search | Contact Us |Link Directory | Workplace Mold | Air Conditioning Mold

| Mold  Advice Books | Mold Test Kits | Mold Lab Services | Mold Cleaner & Killer |
| Video Inspection Scope | Mold Training | Mold Legal Forms | Mold Attorney | 
| Visa for USA Immigration |  Marriage Matchmaking Service |  FREE Mold Advice Hotline  
| DIY Mold Removal | Do It Yourself Mold Removal | DIY Mold |

 
Please also visit:  [Staining] [Sealer]

Wood Furniture Refinishing

Wood Staining | Wood Sealer

Our wood furniture refinishing section contains detailed step by step instructions on how refinish your home furniture. We also include information on how to repair your wood furniture before refinishing, and types of related wood finishes. Remember, if you can't find the answers in our extensive content, visit our furniture refinishing forum, where a do-it- yourself expert is waiting to help you do it yourself.

Chemically Stripping Wood


Introduction:
Refinishing furniture doesn't have to be painful. With our help, it can even be fun.

What You Will Need: Here we show you project requirements you'll want to consider before you begin.
 

Preparing the Surface: Is the old finish salvageable? What was it? What to do now? We've got answers.
 

Stripping the Wood: Learn all about painted furniture, unpainted furniture, stripping, dipping, and more.

Making Repairs:
Wood repair should be completed after stripping and before sanding and staining.
 

Sanding the Wood: Obtain the desired finish without gouging the wood or sanding through the veneer.

Staining Wood Surfaces: Staining is used to enrich the grain pattern of wood or to darken its overall tone.

Sealing and Wood Finishing: Do you know the best way to preserve the new look of your furniture?

Applying the Finish: Whether lacquer, varnish, or wax, we'll help smooth the way to a great finish.
 

A Checklist: We've got the list of what you'll need to take your project from start to...finish.

Related Wood Finish Info:


• Lacquer Info
• Polyurethane Info
• Repairing Chairs
• Steel Wool Refinishing
• Stripping Furniture
• Time to Strip?
• Tung Oil Info
• Varnish Info
• Wood Finishes
• When Should I Change My Sandpaper?
• Repair Furniture Surfaces: Finishes
• Stripping Wood Finishes


Furniture Refinishing - Bringing Out the Best of the Wood


What You Will Be Doing

Many who want to refinish a piece of their furniture are put off by the amount of work involved. Others are often times too impatient to complete the job and end up with something they either are dissatisfied with or no longer like well enough to go back and do it right Still others are fearful of ruining a cherished table or chair.

Refinishing furniture does not have to be painful. It can even be fun. But you must first have the right attitude and realize that a thorough job cannot be completed in one day.

New materials and products for refinishing wood are frequently introduced on the market. It helps to consult your local home center or hardware store personnel for suggestions concerning the particular item you will be working on.

The suggestions in this chapter are meant to serve as an overview of basic techniques. It covers two different procedures of stripping, one for items having multiple layers of paint and/or old finish the other for stripping unpainted furniture.

A few tips on furniture repair will be covered, because, usually, every piece requiring refinishing needs some repair as well. This step should always be taken care of prior to the final staining and sealing of your furniture.

Finishing can be achieved in a variety of ways from antiquing and custom painting to the use of a simple hand-rubbed oil on bare wood. This section only covers the stripping, staining, and finishing processes but also includes a variety of materials for you to choose from.

Before You Begin - Safety


Because of the caustic chemicals involved in refinishing furniture, great care must be taken to follow safe-use practices.


1. Always use the proper tool for the job at hand.


2. When working with chemicals, remember that they are flammable. Do not smoke.


3. Wear durable rubber or neophrene gloves, safety goggles, and long sleeves when stripping wood, to protect against splatters and chemical burns, especially to eyes.


4. Chemical strippers produce vapors which are harmful if inhaled. Provide for proper ventilation with a window fan, or do the work outside.


5. Seal all healing and air-conditioning ducts and electrical outlets when sanding indoors. Wood dust can ignite. If your project involves a lot of sanding the basement would be a poor choice. The ventilation is inadequate, and wood dust can ruin a furnace or washing machine motor.


6. Take care in storing oily rags, which can spontaneously combust.


7. Wear ear protectors when using power tools, since some operate at noise levels that can damage hearing.


8. Always unplug your sander when changing the sandpaper.


9. Individuals with pulmonary disorders or weakness should consult with a physician before using chemical strippers.


10. Keep all chemical strippers and materials out of the reach of children and animals.


11. Most older paints contain lead, the particles of which are released by any means of stripping. The proper respirator with a cartridge designed to filter lead should be worn when stripping, sanding, or scraping. A dust mask is inadequate. Keep pregnant women and children out of the area. Wash work clothes separately from other laundry.


Useful Terms


• Camphored - Refers to edges or corners that are worn and/or rounded with use. This condition usually enhances the piece and adds value to it
• Lacquer - A clear finish.
• Mineral spirits - An inexpensive paint thinner which cleans brushes, thins paint, cleans furniture, and removes wax.
• Paraffin - A wax applied to the edges of drawers and other movable parts to prevent sticking.
• Penetrating resin - A finish which darkens and penetrates the surface of the wood. This type of finish is not easily removed.
• Polyurethane - A clear, acrylic finish.
• Tack cloth - A sticky cloth which picks up fine dust. It is used to wipe over wood before a stain or finish is applied.
• Varnish - A resinous finish used to give a glossy surface to wood.

Furniture Refinishing - What You Will Need


Time: Time will depend on the size and complexity of your project Be sure to allow plenty of time to complete the stripping in one day, and remember to allow for drying times for any finishes you apply.
 

Tools: Tools required for refinishing furniture are not very specialized. Most of them should be found in your home toolbox.


Natural bristle brushes (preferable to synthetic ones, which can melt when they come in contact with harsh chemicals)
Steel wool (0000-3)
Old paint brushes
Paint scraper
Plastic buckets
Putty knife
Brass bristle brushes
Screwdrivers
Durable rubber gloves
Safety goggles
Canvas and plastic drop cloths
Squeegee
Screwdrivers
Wood chisels
Files
Syringe or putty knife
Sanding shapes
Sanding block
Orbital sander
Electric drill
Lamb's wool pad for drill
Vacuum cleaner
Rubber mallet
Various clamps (appropriate to your project)
Very sharp razor blade
Seam roller

Materials: The materials are somewhat specialized, although many of these you will have on hand, and all of them are readily available at home centers and hardware stores.

Denatured alcohol
Cotton balls
Clean dry rags
Steel wool
Paper towels or rags
Newspaper
Cardboard box
Cotton swabs
Toothpicks
Sandpaper (100-120 grit)
Carpenter's wood glue
Wood dough
Waxed paper
Tack cloth
Plastic sheeting
Masking tape
Lacquer thinner
Paraffin or linseed oil
Latex wood filler
Mineral spirits
Stain
Sanding sealer
Finishing sealer
Paste wax
Permits and Codes
No permits are needed when refinishing furniture. Codes do not apply here.
Design
The design aspect of furniture refinishing rests in your choice of pieces to strip, repair and refinish. Choose carefully for value. planning the selection to enhance the individual rooms of your home.
Most Common Mistakes
The most common mistake in furniture refinishing is failure to read and follow manufacturers' instructions for chemicals being used. Other common mistakes are listed with each specific step.

Furniture Refinishing - Preparing the Surface


Most Common Mistakes


Not cleaning the surface thoroughly before refinishing. Sometimes, if a piece of furniture is not too badly damaged, or if it is just worn, it is possible to patch up the original finish so that the authentic quality of the furniture can be saved.


Thoroughly clean the surface of the piece with a commercial wood cleaner, mineral spirits, or wax remover, to determine whether the present finish is salvageable. Then carefully look over the item to determine if a total refinishing job is necessary.


Determine which top finish was originally used. Begin by soaking a cotton ball with denatured alcohol. Apply this to an out-of-view area and let soak for ten minutes. If the finish dissolves, it is shellac. If not apply a lacquer thinner with a brush to an out-of-view spot on the piece. If this method dissolves the finish, you know you are working with lacquer.


If neither of the above tests brings results, your piece has either a varnish or a synthetic top finish, both of which require a liquid stripper for removal.


Often surface blemishes, such as white spots and water rings, have not penetrated deeply. Use a 2/0 or 3/0 steel wool pad and a little paraffin or linseed oil to rub the spot. Rub with the grain of the wood. Once the spot is removed, wipe the surface with a dry rag and add a paste wax.


If the finish is merely worn out you can sometimes overcoat with the same finish. (Follow the procedure outlined above to determine which finish to use.) Apply one coat and allow it to dry thoroughly. Then rub with a 2/0 or finer 0000-00 steel wool pad and wax with a paste wax. (Always test an inconspicuous spot before applying the finish to the entire piece.)


If the finish on the piece is in good condition, with only slightly damaged areas to be touched up, I recommend the reamalgamation technique. Use the appropriate solution tested in the procedure outlined above to dissolve the finish of the damaged area.


Dip a natural bristle brush or fine steel wool into the solvent; then brush or gently rub it into the damaged area until the defect disappears. Apply more solvent to the area with long, light strokes - with the grain - to smooth the amalgamated finish. Once this is dry, remove any rough spots with a 2/0 or 3/0 steel wool. Finish with a paste wax.

Furniture Refinishing - Stripping the Wood


Margin of Error. Remove Paint and Paint Haze


Most Common Mistakes


1. Attempting to refinish a piece that is fully assembled. Break it down when you can for an easier, more thorough job.


2. Leaving the tops off of strippers while using. They evaporate quickly.


3. Failure to apply enough stripper to the surface of the work to keep it wet As a result it evaporates and dries out the wood. Never apply stripper in direct sunlight.


4. Not waiting the required amount of time for the stripper to work thereby necessitating harsh scraping of the wood.


5. Spreading the stripping process over two or more days. Plan your time to complete the stripping in one day so you won't have to come back to paint that has had time to re-harden.


6. Leaving some of the paint on the wood with the intention of sanding it off usually does more harm than good. Let the stripper do the work!


Unpainted Furniture


Unpainted furniture coated with only a stain, sealer, or varnish does not require a preliminary application of semi-paste stripper. Simply begin with the thin liquid stripper and follow the procedure outlined below under Painted Furniture. Use an old natural bristle brush and keep the surfaces wet with the stripper while working.
Painted Furniture that has been painted can be stripped by hand. While it's more expensive than tankstripping (sometimes called "dipping"), the investment is a sound one. There is less chance of serious damage to the wood, and the wood is left a brighter color. This makes it easier to refinish it in a light or natural tone.


Most strippers have either a semi-paste or a thin liquid consistency, the premium agent of which is methylene chloride. When working with built-up layers of paint or varnish, begin with the semi-paste to remove 95 percent of the paint. Follow with a liquid stripper to complete the stripping. The optimum temperature for working with wood stripper is between 60 and 70 degrees. You'll want to wear old clothes for this step. Also, durable rubber stripper gloves. Use goggles to protect your eyes from splatters. Set up a table in a place where you can work comfortably. If working indoors, protect your floors and any other furniture in the area.


Cover the floor with a thick (at least 4 mi.) layer of plastic and add a canvas drop cloth on top of that. Open all the windows and provide further for adequate ventilation by installing a window fan exhausting outdoors. Have a respirator on hand and wear it if the fumes from the stripper are strong. These fumes are harmful if inhaled. To make the job more manageable, strip parts separately when you can. Remove mirrors from their frames prior to stripping, to avoid damaging the silvering, which would be costly to replace. By separating the drawers, doors, and other pieces, you can elevate them to a more comfortable working height Remove all hardware, hinges, and door handles and place them in a bucket of liquid stripper to soak.

 

Cover the bucket to reduce evaporation of the stripper. Pour a semi-paste stripper into another bucket to work from. I do not recommend working directly from the container, as stripper easily evaporates. The container should be kept sealed to avoid drying. Apply the paste to the surface of the wood, using an old natural bristle paint brush. (Natural bristles do not have the tendency to melt away in these harsh chemicals, as do synthetic bristles.) Work from the top to the bottom, one section at a time. Spread the stripper liberally in one direction with the brush. Apply it thickly into the carved areas. Because stripper has a fairly fast evaporation rate, take care to keep the surface wet while the stripper is working.


Depending on the kind of stripper and the number of paint layers you need to remove, you can expect to wait from five to twenty minutes before scraping. (Read the manufacturer's instructions for application time.) The semi-paste is thick enough to cling to vertical and upside-down surfaces. It softens and lifts the paint up from the surface of the wood but does not discolor, raise the grain, or destroy the wood's natural patina.

It may take several applications to lift off all of the old finish. Practice and patience go a long way here. Always let the stripper do the work. If you laboriously try to scrape or chisel the paint off, the direct pressure to the scraper could cause it to gouge and damage the very wood you are trying to preserve.


When the stripper has done its work use your scraper to lift and remove the residue. Consolidate the residue in an old cardboard box for easier clean-up. Scrapers are available with various curves and picks to make working with carvings and rounded legs less frustrating. Pipe cleaners and toothpicks are also useful. (A set of old dental tools is perfect for stripping intricate woodwork.)

Thin Liquid Stripper. Once 95 percent of the old finish is removed with the semi-paste, use another old natural bristle paint brush to apply the thin liquid stripper from another bucket. Again, keep the surfaces moist while you are working, to avoid drying out the wood. And wear your goggles for this step, since the liquid splatters much easier than does the paste.

When the liquid has had a few minutes to work (read the manufacturer's instructions for proper time frame), use a brass-bristled brush to work the solvent into the carvings and corners. Steel wool can be used for this step as well, but the brass brush is superior. The bristles don't break down and get caught in the grain like steel wool.

Keep two separate buckets of the liquid on hand - one to use over and over again while scrubbing and the other to use for a final rinse. Once the brass bristles have broken up the remaining paint the old paint brush makes a great agitation tool to rinse the paint away. The final rinse with the clean stripper is important. It will remove any film or "paint haze" caused by a little of the paint left in the previous bath of solvent. Never use a water rinse. It tends to raise the grain of the wood.

Furniture Refinishing - Making Repairs


Margin of Error - Remove Paint and Paint Haze


Most Common Mistakes


1. Failing to make all necessary repairs before refinishing. Although most of us look over our furniture carefully before beginning the stripping process to detect any repairs that may be needed, it is even more important to check again after stripping for conditions that may have been hidden under layers of old paint and varnish. Any repair that must be done on wood should be completed after stripping but before sanding and staining.

Veneer
If you know that you will be working with veneer (thin, finished layers of wood), you don't want to allow the stripper toremain on the surface too long. It can seep into the cracks and lift the veneer by dissolving the adhesive.

Detect loose veneer edges by tapping your fingernail on it and listening for a change in sound. Before gluing, clean and scrape away the old glue and dirt at the contact points, being careful not to split the veneer more than it already is. Fill in the crack of the veneer with a small bit of carpenter's glue slipped in on the end of a putty knife. Or purchase aninexpensive 20 gauge needle syringe, which slides under the veneer neatly and gently to apply a small amount of glue. Press down on the repair and wipe up any excess glue that oozes out of the crack. Cover the area with waxed paper and law a weight on it so that the surfaces are firmly pressed together while the glue is setting up.

When there are bubbles, cut into the veneer with a sharp razor blade using a steel rule for guidance. Make an "X" cut neither cut should be with the grain of the wood. Then clean, fill, and weight down the surfaces, as outlined above. Use a seam roller to press the veneer in place. Always allow ample time for the adhesive to set and dry before continuing the refinishing process.


Chairs
Here's a tip on checking the condition of wooden chairs. Kneel on the seat while holding on to the back of the chair. Then rock gently back and forth to detect any loose joints. Old and brittle glue is common with old chairs. Dismantle any loose joints prior to stripping. Always use your hands or a rubber mallet to prevent denting and marring when dismantling furniture. After stripping, sand the joint.

Reassemble the leg and stretcher, adding carpenter's wood glue before inserting the stretcher into the hole. Clamp the legs together with a bar clamp. Place small scraps of wood between the jaws of the clamp and the legs to prevent damage to the wood. Allow the glue to dry thoroughly before the final sanding and finishing phase.

Furniture Refinishing - Sanding the Wood


Margin of Error: Sand enough to obtain desired finish yet not enough to gouge the wood or sand through the veneer


Most Common Mistakes


1. Sanding with an orbital sander that oscillates at less than 8,400 orbits per minute. This leaves swirl marks and scratches.


2. Refinishing requires time and patience. Plan enough time between steps to allow the glue to set and dry, the sanding to be thorough, and the finishes to dry properly. High humidity can more than double recommended drying time.


3. Gouging the wood with a belt sand in an electric drill. Stripping closes the grain of the wood to the penetration of stain and finish. Sanding reopens the grain, evens out any discoloration that may have been left by a previous stain, and erases any scratches or blemishes in the surface. Most of your furniture refinishing will require a sandpaper of 100 to 120 grits. Change the paper frequently. Once it begins to wear out it is no longer sanding, but polishing, which will close the grain again. To make your sandpaper last longer, use an old toothbrush to clean out the clogged sandpaper.


For all-purpose refinishing, the ideal tool is an orbital sander that oscillates at around 8,400 orbits per minute. This speed assures elimination of swirl marks and scratches in the wood. (I do not recommend a belt sander or sanding discs attached to a drill. These gouge the wood and leave obvious sanding marks.) You need not press down on the sander - its own weight will do the work. Just keep the pressure equal and guide the sander in even sweeps, always sanding with the grain. When sanding veneers, remember that most are very thin (1/32"), so be careful.


Use a sanding block with 100 to 120 grit sandpaper for smaller areas. A rubber or padded sanding block has a little more give for odd areas. It also helps to have some different wood shapes (round, curved, etc.) available while you work You can wrap the sandpaper around these when sanding curves or recessed molding. Remember to apply even pressure and sand with the grain whenever possible. Change the sandpaper frequently.


And be sure to remove any glue that might have remained on the wood where you made repairs. Where wood dough has been applied, take care to sand the surface flush so as not to leave a halo when you stain.
Once the sanding process is complete you will want to clean the piece and the surrounding area thoroughly. Vacuum up all the dust and go over the piece's) you are refinishing with a tack cloth to pick up any remaining fine dust


Tip: To check on the condition of wooden chairs, kneel on the seat while holding on to the back of the chair, then rock gently back and forth to detect any loose joints.

Please also visit:  [Staining] [Sealer]

 

 

[Home] [Repair or Replace It?] [Electrical Repair] [Drywall] [Heat Air] [Roofing] [Door Repair] [Gutters] [Window Repair] [Kitchen Remodel] [Toilet Repair] [Carpet Repair] [Appliances] [Plumbing] [Home Repair Glossary] [Home Security] [Wood Refinishing] [Home Safety] [Electrical Repair] [Attic Repair] [Deck Cleaning] [Door Repair] [Concrete Repair] [Home Heating Tips] [Laminate Floors] [Wallpaper Repair] [Painting Interiors] [Painting Exteriors] [Building Book Cases] [Winter Fire Prevention Advice] [Search] [Bathroom Remodel] [Drywall] [Air Duct Cleaning] [About-Us] [Contact Us] [Link-Directory]

Do-It-Best-Yourself Mold Solutions

Phil can help you fix your own property’s mold problems at low-cost, more safely, and better-in- results than what is done by many mold inspectors and mold contractors.  How can Phil help you?

     1. Read Phil’s five plain-English,
mold advice books to master mold inspection, testing, removal, remediation, and prevention for your house, condo, apartment, office,  or workplace.

     2. Buy do-it-yourself, affordable mold test kits, mold lab analysis, video inspection scope, mold cleaner, mold killer,
and a mold-killing high ozone generator for the  successful toxic and household mold inspection, mold testing, mold species identification and quantification, mold cleaning, mold removal, and mold remediation to find mold, kill mold, clean mold, and remove mold from your residence or commercial building.

     3. Get FREE mold advice, mold help, and/or answers to your mold questions, by emailing mold expert Phillip Fry at
phil@moldinspector.com. You can also email pictures of your mold problems in jpeg file format as email attachments.

 

Helpful Environmental & Health Websites
| Mold Attorney | Caribbean Mold InspectionCertified Hygienists DirectoryCertified Mold Inspectors Directory | Condominium Mold Inspection | Environmental ProductsEnvironmental Hygienist Training | Factory Mould Inspection |Government Building Mold InspectionHospital Mold InspectionHotel Mold Inspection | Inspector Del MoldeLos Angeles Mold Inspection | |Miami Mold TestingMold Inspector Training | Mold Inspection | Mold Inspector | Mold Inspector Training | Mold Products and Services |Mold School | Mold TrainingMold Training And Certification | Office Mold Inspection | Orange County Mold InspectionPublic Building Mold Inspection | Sacramento Mold Inspection | San Diego Home Inspection | San Diego Mold Inspection | San Francisco Mold Inspection | San Jose Mold Inspection | School Mold Inspection | Senior Housing Mold Inspection |Store Mold InspectionToxic Mold Inspection | Toxic Mold Inspector | Warehouse Mold Inspection | Natural Supplements | Dietary Supplements | Male Performance Supplement | Tongkat Ali | Hong Kong Sex Pills | China Mould Testing | Air Conditioning Mold | Mold Test Kits | Ozone Blasting | Ozone Generator | Household Mold Removal | Workplace Mold | Mold Health | Mold Remediation Safety Gear Home Repair |  Home Renovation | Home Remodeling |

Find Hidden Toxic Mold Growth by inspecting inside walls, ceilings, and heating/cooling ducts and equipment with your own Video PRO Inspection Scope

 

Buy Boric Acid as a Non-Toxic and Natural
 Way To Remove, Kill and Prevent Household Mold and Toxic Mold, as well as Kill Cockroaches

 

 

Do-It-Best-Yourself Mold Solutions

Phil can help you fix your own property’s mold problems at low-cost, more safely, and better-in- results than what is done by many mold inspectors and mold contractors.  How can Phil help you?

     1. Read Phil’s five plain-English,
mold advice books to master mold inspection, testing, removal, remediation, and prevention for your house, condo, apartment, office,  or workplace.

     2. Buy do-it-yourself, affordable mold test kits, mold lab analysis, video inspection scope, mold cleaner, mold killer,
and a mold-killing high ozone generator for the  successful toxic and household mold inspection, mold testing, mold species identification and quantification, mold cleaning, mold removal, and mold remediation to find mold, kill mold, clean mold, and remove mold from your residence or commercial building.

     3. Get FREE mold advice, mold help, and/or answers to your mold questions, by emailing mold expert Phillip Fry at
phil@moldinspector.com . You can also email pictures of your mold problems in jpeg file format as email attachments.

Home | Site  Map | Private Policy | Search | Contact Us | Links Directory | Ecotour/Travel Guide

Air Condition Information | Air Duct Cleaning | Appliance Repair and Remodel |Attic Repair |Bathroom Repair and Remodel |
Carpet Repair  | Concrete Repair Maintenance | Deck Cleaning | Door Repair | Electrical Repair | Gutter Repair and Remodel |
|
Home Heating Tips | Home Security | Home Safety | Kitchen Repair and Remodel | Laminate | Painting Exteriors |
|
Painting Interiors  | Plumbing Repair and Remodel | Roof Repair and Remodel | Toilet Repair and Remodel | Wall and Ceiling | Window Repair | Wood Refinishing |
Visa for USA Immigration |  Marriage Matchmaking Service | FREE Mold Advice Hotline


 


This website is owned and operated by Health & Wealth Guardian, LLT. Copyright©2002-2013 All Rights Reserved.